Snow – A metaphor about metaphors

When a teacher has to reach out to a student who is far beneath his or her level of knowledge and understanding, he or she cannot allow the water to just flow freely, it has to be dressed up in metaphors and it has to be paced. In order for the student to understand a new concept, the teacher needs to create a point of reference by using examples, anecdotes, stories, and analogies. Thus snowflakes represent the need to explain gradually, step by step, in a language that is accessible to the student.

Snow falls gently and silently, teaching us in our own process of educating others and educating ourselves, that we need gentleness. If we educate with a sledgehammer – with unceasing rain pour – it will simply submerge and destroy the crops. Even when it rains on earth, science tells us that on a higher level, the beginning process could have originated in snowflakes. So snowflakes are a symbol of that first gentle step.(…)

 

Words That Help and Heal

On November 19, 1863, two well-known men gave speeches at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The featured speaker, Edward Everett, was a former congressman, governor, and president of Harvard University. Considered one of the greatest orators of his day, Mr. Everett delivered a formal address lasting 2 hours. He was followed by President Abraham Lincoln, whose speech lasted 2 minutes. (…)

Navigating Big Change Without Going Insane

by Nova Wightman (www.theglobalconversation.com)

I’m going through some big changes in my life on many fronts, from my career changing, moving into a new home, going through a recent break-up, to a loved one being sick.  Some days I feel okay about it all, like I can handle it and that it’s leading me to someplace really, really good even if it doesn’t always feel that way.  Other days I feel like I’m drowning and am full of anxiety, I sometimes even feel depressed and helpless.  How can I ride out this time of great transition without going crazy??
Marion, Ohio

 Hi Marion,
Oh do I feel for you.  While I believe that all change is for the better, even the tough kind and even if the evidence of that takes awhile to show itself, I can appreciate the difficulty of the state you’re in while going through it.  I happen to be in a time of great flux as well, and have my “I’m going crazy” moments.  While I won’t get into and make it about me, I will tell you that you’re not alone, and offer you some guidance in the form of how I am navigating it all.

First and foremost, don’t do it alone.  Surround yourself with every person who has ever said “Anything I can do?” or “Let me know if you need anything at all, I’m here for you.”  Take them up on it.  And if you’re short on those kinds of people in your life, hire someone: a coach, a therapist, etc. Or you can reach out to someone on the CWG Helping Outreach team (www.cwghelpingoutreach.com), a team of volunteer Spiritual Helpers who can listen and help you make sense of things.  Also, if you haven’t yet read Neale’s book “When Everything Changes, Change Everything” please grab a copy and dive in.  I will also say that if you think you are clinically depressed, please just stop reading here and go get that help; the following guidance doesn’t really apply in that case.

Now, for the hands on, do it right now advice.  I follow one major rule of thumb when navigating change, and although it is incredibly simple (in theory, not necessarily in application), it is hands down the most effective tool I have come across for navigating such times, as well as life in general.  When you are feeling down, tired, overwhelmed, hopeless, upset, depressed, etc., do not, I repeat DO NOT think of anything important or make important decisions from that place.  Wait until you feel better, even a little bit better, and believe me, you will.  You’ve already identified that you have days/moments where you feel okay or good about things and trust that everything is unfolding the way it needs to.  Those are the times to give those big topics of change your attention, from that better-feeling place that is also known as a “higher vibrating” place.

You see, it is when we are feeling good and vibrating high that we have access to the answers, ideas, resources, inspiration and clarity that we need to help us live more in the flow of life versus trying to swim against the current.  It’s when we are feeling like crap and try to act from that place that we are swimming against the current because, put simply, we don’t have access to all of those things I just listed.  We are clouded, confused, can’t seem to see more than an inch or two in front of our faces, and everything looks worse than it really is.  Sound familiar?

So that’s it in a nutshell.  Avoid the heck out of your reality when you’re feeling down, discipline yourself to simply not give it your attention with the awareness that if you do, you are not accessing truth.  Distract yourself in the meantime with things that help you to feel a tiny bit better until you feel good enough to give it your attention again, even if that looks like taking a nap, crying it out, going for a walk, or watching a movie while eating ice cream (one of my favorites, by the way, though I wouldn’t recommend making this one your go-to move unless you have an extremely high metabolism).

You can accept that this period of transition will be challenging, you will have ups and you will have downs.  During the downs, give yourself a break.  During the ups, milk it for all it’s worth.  You will find yourself on the other side of this, better for it, a higher version of Who You Really Are, and I can sense that you already know that, Marion.  Go ahead and trust that.

(Nova Wightman is a CWG Life Coach, as well as the owner and operator of Go Within Life Coaching, www.gowithincoaching.com, specializing in helping individuals blend their spirituality with their humanity in a way that makes life more enjoyable, easy, and fulfilling.)