A Fond Farewell

30 May 2018 Wednesday 6:49am

“Goodbye doesn’t mean forever.”

It sounds contradictory.

In what sense?

I’m not sure. It just does. Maybe I should look up the meaning of “contradictory.”

Go ahead.

Okay. “Contradictory” means “a proposition so related to a second that it is impossible for both to be true or both to be false.” So, does that apply to that phrase?

I don’t know. You tell me. You’re the one who finds it contradictory. Try to take it apart first.

Okay. “Goodbye” means “farewell (a conventional expression used at parting).” That’s it. That doesn’t really explain much.

How about the word “farewell”?

“Farewell” has more. It means:

1. goodby; may you fare well: Farewell, and may we meet again in happier times.

2. an expression of good wishes at parting: They made their farewells and left.

3. leave-taking; departure: a fond farewell.

4. a party given to a person who is about to embark on a long journey, retire, leave an organization, etc.

Choose one.

I choose #3—“leave-taking; departure: a fond farewell.”

Alright. Replace the word “goodbye” in that phrase with the words “a fond farewell.”

Okay. A fond farewell doesn’t mean forever.

Does that still sound contradictory to you?

Nope. It sounds so much better. It sounds of love all around.

Love never says goodbye, my child.

Yup, love only says a fond farewell.